Monthly Archives: June 2015

Wheelie bins recycling trial

From The Argus

Wheelie bins trial at 4,500 homes to help Brighton and Hove improve its recycling rates

A wheelie bin outside a Brighton home

A wheelie bin outside a Brighton home

WHEELIE bins are set to be trialled in a bid to raise Brighton and Hove’s faltering recycling rates.

Brighton and Hove City Council is proposing bringing in wheelie bins to replace black boxes at 4,500 homes in the Hangleton and Portslade areas of the city.

The local authority is one of the worst-performing in the country with just over 25 per cent of all domestic waste being recycled.

But union bosses have warned that the changes will have very little impact and called on councillors to “be bold” in bringing in more radical solutions for more frequent collections and food waste collection.

The proposed changes, if agreed by the council’s environment, transport and sustainability committee next week, could be rolled out in November.

It is proposed that the £135,000 funding for the scheme will come from reserves and could be paid back in credits obtained from improving recycling rates.

The new scheme, which will begin in areas of the city where most properties have sufficient outside space to store an additional bin, has been made possible by the recent purchase of new refuse vehicles.

Council officers have said the wheelie bins will be easier for residents to use, give them increased storage and improve efficiency.

The wheelie bins will also provide better protection from the elements keeping paper and cardboard dry during downpours and stop recycling littering streets after being blown out of the boxes.

Sodden paper and cardboard is generally not recycled at present.

Wheelie bins will be used to store paper, card, cans and plastic bottles for recycling but glass will need to be collected separately

Councillors have been warned the changes could mean the quality of recycling going down as collection crews will not be able to easily spot contaminations.

To combat that possibility, the council will be spending up to £26,000 on communication and education on what materials should be put in the bins.

Mark Turner, GMB branch secretary, said councillors need to be more bold and find sufficient resources to fund a citywide food waste service, consider more regular collections and be “more robust” in enforcement with residents who do not follow recycling rules.

Councillor Gill Mitchell, chairwoman of the environment, transport and sustainability committee said: “We know there is a strong demand from residents living in suburban areas of the city for recycling wheelie bins.

“This could be a major step towards our commitment to provide a more ‘tailor made’ recycling service for all our residents.”

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Consultation on Further Proposed Changes to the City Plan

From Carly Dockerill, Principal Planning Officer

The council is proposing a number of further changes or ‘Further Proposed Modifications’ to the submitted City Plan Part One in response to the Inspector’s further Matters and Issues published in April 2015 as part of her examination of the Plan.  The Inspector has asked the City Council to undertake public consultation on these further proposed changes.

 The further proposed modifications are primarily focused on ensuring the following policies are consistent with recent changes in national policy:

  • DA7 Toads Hole Valley
  • SA6 Sustainable Neighbourhoods
  • CP8 Sustainable Buildings
  • CP3 Employment Land
  • CP9 Sustainable Transport
  • CP12 Urban Design
  • CP19 Housing Mix
  • CP20 Affordable Housing

 The Inspector also asked the council to re-assess its objectively assessed housing need in light of the government releasing 2012-based Household Projections in February 2015.

Further changes to the City Plan have been proposed to reflect the increased objectively assessed housing need including CP1 Housing Delivery

 The schedule of further proposed modifications include changes resulting from general updates, corrections and in response to consultation at the proposed modification stage (November 2014). These are listed in the guidance note. The schedule, supporting documents and evidence base (published with the further proposed modifications) can be viewed electronically on the council’s website; http://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/planning/local-development-framework/city-plan-consultation

 Hard copies of the documents are held for viewing in the following locations during normal opening hours:

 How to Comment

Public consultation starts Monday 29 June until 5.00pm Monday 10 August 2015.  Comments should be made no later than 5.00pm on Monday 10 August 2015.

 All comments made must be submitted in writing. This can be done by using one of the following methods:

Online: via the Council Consultation Portal: http://consult.brighton-hove.gov.uk/portal

or by using the MS Word Consultation Form and sending this back to us via

 Email:   ldf@brighton-hove.gov.uk or

Post:      Planning Policy Team, Brighton & Hove City Council, Room 201 King’s House, Grand Avenue, Hove, BN3 2LS

A guidance note on the further proposed modifications and on making representations is available to assist you.

The representations will be considered by the planning inspector conducting the Examination and will be published on the council’s website. Please note that representations at this stage can only be made on the Further Proposed Modifications and not on the other parts of the Submission City Plan Part One.

f you have any questions or problems downloading the documents please do contact us.

We look forward to hearing from you.

Kind Regards,                                                           

 Planning Policy Team

Carly Dockerill, Principal Planning Officer

Planning Policy Team, Planning & Building Control

Brighton & Hove City Council
Room 201 Kings House, 
Grand Avenue, Hove, BN3 2LS

T: 01273 292382

E: carly.dockerill@brighton-hove.gov.uk
W: www.brighton-hove.gov.uk

Please note that I work Tues, Weds (all day) & Thurs (am)

London Road Station adopted as a Local Heritage Asset

London Rd Stn 2

From Ted Power, The Round Hill Society

I should like to thank Southdown Rise Residents Association, individuals and Councillors from your ward  who supported the nomination I made two years ago for SHAFTESBURY PLACE, LONDON ROAD STATION BRIGHTON to be added to our city’s Local List of Heritage Assets. 

The good news is that we have succeeded. From 2015 SHAFTESBURY PLACE, LONDON ROAD STATION BRIGHTON has been included in the local list, as confirmed here.

It would be misleading to give the impression that a local listing offers as much protection against ‘unsuitable planning’ as a national listing, but getting our Local Council to value the station and its setting formally is at least a start.

With best wishes,

Ted

Build on the city’s urban fringes?

From The Argus

Urban Fringes

A PLANNING expert has called on city leaders to build on the urban fringe and “push the boundaries” of the National Park in a bid to solve the housing crisis.

Dr Samer Bagaeen, head of the University of Brighton’s planning school, said the current City Plan was not up to scratch and said politicians would have to go back and look at it again.

The expert said: “I think the urban fringe is the key. We don’t have the space in the city. The only areas we can build the number of houses we need is on the outskirts.

“There will be those who object, but they are the ones sitting comfortably in their houses sitting back and saying ‘you know what, we’re fine, but you can’t build that there’. It’s not right.”

He was speaking about the future of the city’s housing at the Construction Voice event, run in conjunction with Brighton and Hove Chamber of Commerce, at the Sussex County Cricket Club.

Dr Bagaeen highlighted urban fringe sites around the racecourse, Woodingdean, Rottingdean and Ovingdean, as key for development along with land north of Patcham.

He added: “There will be naysayers but if we don’t do it now then we will have to do it 10 years down the line.

“We also need to look at the National Park and weigh up the needs of the city and the Park. We need to push the boundaries or certainly push against the boundaries of the National Park. It won’t be popular but we have to. People also need to get over this objection of being able to see housing from the National Park. That cannot be something to stop development.”

Appearing on a panel alongside chartered surveyor Simon de Whalley and chartered architect John McLean, he said the local authority’s City Plan, which sets out proposals for 13,200 new homes by 2030, was “half baked”. He said: “They identify sites in the city where we are going to build but I recently visited them and they are not appropriate.

“For example there is a site off Dyke Road Avenue they said could be built on, but it is so steep that many developers probably wouldn’t take it up. Toad’s Hole Valley is the biggest site but other than that there is nothing significant. At this rate we are going to be unable to meet the need for housing.”

To add to the problem, the government’s updated household projections released in February state the city now needs around 30,000 new homes by 2030. He added: “The City Plan is half baked. It needs to be looked at again.”

A council spokeswoman said the City Plan housing target of 13,200 was a “robust figure” which had been to public consultation. She added that the Urban Fringe Assessment Study, carried out last year, weighed the benefits of meeting more of the city’s housing requirements against any adverse impacts of development.

Hollingdean Coachwerks Bike Night – 1 July

The Handle Bar: Monthly bike night at Coachwerks. Wednesday 1st July, 7.30 – 10.00

Come along and socialise, this month we’ll have a talk and discussion with Mike Aitken on cycling cultures in Mexico.

What’s it like campaigning for bikes in other places? What can we learn and what can we share?

Mike Aiken spent two years in Mexico, researching community participation and civil society groups.

Bring your own tortillas and chillies for a short talk, photos from the front line, and contrast our achievements and problems.

Coachwerks are also setting up a bike-fixing workshop so that you can come and maintain your bike with their tools and help.

At Coachwerks, 19a Hollingdean Terrace … thecoachwerks.wordpress.cominfo@bartlebysbrewery.com.

coachwerks-open-day-3

Bikestock 2015 – Stanmer Park, Saturday 27th June, 11am – 5pm, FREE!

Bikestock300x450

Bikestock 2015 – Stanmer Park, Saturday 27th June, 11am – 5pm, FREE!

We love to ride our bicycles! A great, fun cycling festival for all the family organised by Sustrans. See how many laps your family can do round the specially designed off road track in Stanmer, plus lots of fun cycling related activities.

For details click the poster above.

Bikestock

Free ‘poo-bags’ for dog owners

A campaign to encourage responsible dog ownership is being brought to Brighton on Wednesday 17th June.

Gloria Animal welfare officers from Brighton & Hove City Council will be supporting the Dogs Trust’s ‘Big Scoop Week’ giving out advice, information and free ‘poo bags’ to dog owners in Kemptown and Patcham.

The team will set up a stand at Ladies Mile Nature reserve in Patcham at 10am and on the grassed area outside Hampshire Court from 2pm to 4pm.

Dog owners will be able to find out about rules and regulations affecting them including the council’s Dog Walkers Code of Conduct.

The officers will also have information about rehoming stray dogs found in the city like Gloria, pictured, who was successfully re-homed after being found in a city park.