Tag Archives: Community

Response to City Plan 2 – your support needed

An ‘HMO’ is a House In Multiple Occupation, as the name suggests a property where several different individuals or groups live together, often a shifting population such as students or perhaps separate flats which may or may not share facilities. The classification began primarily to ensure that such properties met with basic safety requirements, but as time progressed the licensing of HMOs turned in addition to regulating how many could be sited in one area, and what rules applied – for instance clearing away rubbish from the pavements outside. In Brighton the huge expansion of student housing in particular led to a proliferation of privately owned HMOs and sadly some of these are not as well managed as they should be. To its credit the council recognises that where there is a high concentration of HMOs problems can arise, particularly while the City would wish to protect families and the elderly in existing communities from undue change a surge in HMO properties may actually have a ‘clearing effect’ upon existing communities. This is a hot topic in Planning as well. The council therefore is consulting upon what is a fair approach to HMO’s in Brighton. All views are eligible and welcome through its website, whilst one group of residents in East Brighton have specifically asked if we as the SRRA group might consider reading and supporting their proposed response.

From East Brighton Neighbours:-

“Dear Neighbours,

Having got the council to agree to begin the survey process that we hope will lead to an Article 4 Direction to restrict the spread of student HMOs in our area, we’re now asking for your support in our response to the council’s Draft City Plan Part Two.

The plan has a section dealing with future policies on Houses in Multiple Occupation (HMOs) and the more of us who put forward our views, the more likely we are to influence what goes into the final version of the City Plan.

We have formulated the attached response –  RESPONSE TO CITY PLAN 2.

Please find the time to read it and, if you feel you want to support it, just reply to eastbrightonneighbours@gmail.com with the following content:

Name

Address

Email address            

and underneath:

I support and endorse East Brighton Neighbours response to Draft City Plan Two.

That’s all you need to do.  We will attach your email endorsements to the response and submit it to the council.

THE CONSULTATION PERIOD ENDS ON SEPT 13th, so please send us your email response as soon as possible.

You can view the whole of Draft City Plan Part Two here,  and if you prefer to submit your own response, they have an online consultation portal.

Also feel free to pass on this email to anyone you think would also be interested in supporting our response to the Plan.

Many thanks for your support so far.

Regards,

Louise, Michaela, Chris, Tony, Brian, Marlene, Claire, Paul, Pete. (East Brighton Neighbours)”

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Tell us about the places in your neighbourhood

From Paula Goncalves – 

The council is developing new guidance – the Urban Design Framework – to help shape buildings and spaces around the city. The aim is to make them easier to use and more attractive to people.

As the city grows we will be presented with proposals to develop and build new buildings and places. This provides the opportunity to improve existing areas as well as making sure we get usable, flexible and high quality new buildings and attractive public spaces.

To help us achieve this aim, the council wants to learn about your experience of the city to help create more welcoming buildings and public spaces through design.

Everyone in Brighton & Hove is invited to take part in a survey to share their views about the places they use and how they think these places could be improved.

All over the city there are close-to-home places that people have access to and enjoy spending time in. These can include parks, streets, squares, common areas of schools (eg playgrounds and playing fields), transport facilities and shopping areas.

Please fill in the survey at https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/udf-places The survey is open until 13 September 2018.

The information you provide will help shape the Urban Design Framework which the council, developers and landowners will use to make sure buildings and spaces fit the needs and aspirations of everyone who lives, works, studies in and visits the city.

Paula Goncalves
Planning Policy, Projects & Heritage Team
Brighton & Hove City Council

Email: planningprojects@brighton-hove.gov.uk
W: www.brighton-hove.gov.uk

Tree replacement in Springfield Road

A group of SRRA members is embarking on a pilot project to replace trees in Springfield Road that have been lost or are in danger due to disease.

The Council Arborealist has identified five trees as needing replacement.

If successful the initiative could be extended to other streets in the area.

We will be raising funds in the near future so watch this space, if you would like to help please reply with your email address and we will be in touch.

SRRA Meeting Tues. 25th July

The next SRRA meeting will take place on Tuesday 25th July at the One Church, Florence Road between 7.00 and 8.30 pm.

We will be discussing plans for our activities for the next year including issues raised at the AGM, click here for the minutes; as well as electing officers.

All residents are welcome, please try to attend if you want to help improve our neighbourhood.

Private Rented Sector Licensing Consultation

The council is currently consulting on two proposed licensing schemes for private rented housing in the city.

The aim is to improve consistency of management and maintenance standards in the city’s private rented housing. The council is required to consult interested parties about the schemes and consider representations before reaching a final decision.

The full background on the decision to propose these schemes is given in the private rented sector discretionary licensing reports discussed by the Housing & New Homes Committee on 16 November 2016 and 14 June 2017.

The consultations close at midnight on Sunday 10 September 2017.

Additional licensing consultation

Councils can introduce additional licensing schemes for HMOs smaller than those to which the mandatory…

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Slow worms could halt railway allotments development

From Brighton & Hove News

A developer’s plans to squeeze a terrace of four homes onto old railway allotments in Brighton is being stalled by the question of whether or not there are slow worms living there.

allotments-300x169

 

People living near the patch of land, which backs onto the Open House pub’s garden on Springfield Road, say they were horrified when the new owner of the site, Brighton Housing Developments, cleared it before Christmas.

Planning permission was given on appeal in 2014 to build four houses on the site – subject to the snakelike reptiles being moved to a new home.

But this runs out in March, and John Blackburn-Panteli, director of Brighton Housing Developments which bought the plot in December last year, has now submitted a survey which states that no slow worms live on the site, so no relocation is needed.

However, county ecologist Kate Cole says the survey was done during periods of frosty nights, which could have triggered the slow worms’ hibernation period and account for none being found.

A petition to save the allotments from development has now been signed by more than 400 people. Clare Tyler, who started it, said: “The old railway allotments between Springfield Road and London Road station, home to a wealth of wildlife and a much-loved conservation area in the heart of the city, have been destroyed.

“Much to our dismay, a developer recently bought the land with planning permission, and hastily chopped down all the woodland just before Christmas without any prior notice to the local residents or the community and plans to build four houses, immediately beside the rail track and Open House pub.

“The community are fighting this, and we will continue to fight. The piece of land was an oasis of woodland, shrubbery and wildlife.

“Now it’s a barren site – we hope it can be saved, and at the very least, we want the developers to strictly adhere to all conditions going forward- and the slow worms saved!”

Click here for the full story.