Tag Archives: Brighton and Hove City Council

Draft Waste and Minerals Policies Consultation

DRAFT EAST SUSSEX, SOUTH DOWNS AND BRIGHTON & HOVE WASTE AND MINERALS LOCAL PLAN REVISED POLICIES DOCUMENT – CONSULTATION: 11th MAY 2020 TO 3RD AUGUST 2020

East Sussex County Council, Brighton & Hove City Council and the South Downs National Park Authority are proposing changes to their adopted Waste and Minerals Local Plan (WMLP). These changes are set out in the draft Waste and Minerals Local Plan Revised Policies Document, which has been published for consultation.

The three Authorities have carefully considered whether to proceed with the consultation given the current emergency measures put in place by the Government. In light of this, the Authorities have decided to proceed with a consultation over an extended period of 12 weeks, which may further be extended if required. We are therefore seeking representations from all stakeholders and members of the public on the contents of the Draft Revised Policies of the Waste and Minerals Local Plan. Comments should be made between 11 May and 3 August 2020.

The consultation draft plan and a full set of supporting documentation can be found at our online consultation portal http://consult.eastsussex.gov.uk. If you are unable to view the documentation online, please contact us.

How do I make representations?

Our online consultation portal http://consult.eastsussex.gov.uk has been designed to make submitting comments via a website much easier and we encourage its use. Anyone can view the proposed consultation draft documents on the portal but to make comments you will need to have a username. If you have not registered before please click on the ‘Login/Register’ icon on the website and enter your details. Registering your email address will enable us to notify you by email of future stages in the preparation of the Plan. Please contact us (details below) if you encounter any problems.

You can also submit your representations by completing the online form and emailing to wasteandmineralsdf@eastsussex.gov.uk. Representations can also be sent to us by post to the following address:

RPD Consultation 2020, Planning Policy & Development Management, Communities Economy and Transport, East Sussex County Council, St Anne’s Crescent, Lewes, BN7 1UE.

The deadline for representations is midnight on Monday 3 August 2020.

Contact Us

If you have any queries please email us at wasteandmineralsdf@eastsussex.gov.uk or planningpolicy@brighton-hove.gov.uk , by telephone: East Sussex County Council, Waste & Minerals Planning Policy team on 01273 481846.

We look forward to receiving your representations.

Edward Sheath                            Liz Hobden                                    Tim Slaney

Head of Planning                          Head of Planning                          Director of Planning

East Sussex County Council       Brighton & Hove City Council      South Downs National Park Authority

Planning application for a transmitter mast opposite Downs Junior School

This has been forwarded by a resident.

A group of mobile phone companies has submitted a planning application for the erection of a massive transmitter mast to be built on the paved area just to the north of the old tram shelter in Ditchling Road, opposite Downs Junior School. It is 20m high (equivalent to a seven-story building) and will have six separate transmitters at the top. This is an industrial scale structure and will be seen from most of the Preston, Fiveways and Hollingdean areas.

The application can be viewed by using this link:-

https://planningapps.brighton-hove.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=summary&keyVal=Q84943DM0PA00

If you have difficulties with this link, then you can access the Brighton and Hove Council’s planning site for application BH2020/00980.

There are important planning regulation reasons for rejection as the City Plan (CT15 Heritage) states that proposed applications should not cause significant harm to a listed building (the school is Listed Grade ll building) or to a Conservation Area – the site is adjacent to Preston Park Conservation Area. However more important reasons for rejection should be that the site is adjacent to two schools and the mast will tower over the Junior School’s playground.

Objections must be submitted by 5th May and because of Coronavirus the planning committee has been replaced by three councillors who now make decisions on planning applications. So, it is more than ever vital to make your views known.

 

 

Autumn/Winter Active for Life Programme out now!

From Corinna Edwards-Colledge, Active for Life Manager.

I am delighted to be able to let you know that the Autumn-Winter 2019/20 Active for Life Programme is out now and valid until the end of April 2020.  As usual it contains all our regular and special Healthwalks and 50 walks and physical activity opportunities for all ages and abilities every week.

Click here to view and download it.

Corinna

Graffiti removal enforcement consultation

From Brighton & Hove City Council:-

We’ve launched a consultation on our proposals to tackle graffiti and tagging in the city.

We’re only responsible for removing graffiti from our own buildings unless it’s offensive. But what about private buildings?

Please make sure you have your say:- https://consultations.brighton-hove.gov.uk/rubbish-recycling-and-streets/graffiti-removal-enforcement-consultation/

Housing or rewilding? Debate over future of Brighton’s golf courses hots up

From Brighton & Hove News:-

Hollingbury Golf Course

The future of Brighton’s council-owned golf courses is provoking a strong debate as the clock ticks down to the deadline for bids.

The council wants to re-let the sites at Hollingbury and Waterhall, and is inviting bids for leisure or conservation uses.

But the city’s Liberal Democrats have called for the Hollingbury course to be used instead for much-needed affordable housing.

Click here for full report.

Tougher rules agreed to restrict growth of student houses

From Brighton & Hove News

Restrictions on new shared houses across Brighton and Hove have been given the go ahead by councillors.

Members of the Brighton and Hove City Council Tourism, Development and Culture Committee unanimously agreed to introduce an “Article 4” restriction on houses in multiple occupation (HMOs) across the entire city.

Six years ago, in January 2013, the first restrictions were brought in to prevent home owners from using “permitted development rights” to turn their properties into shared houses without planning permission.

The rule change currently affects five wards – Moulsecoomb and Bevendean, Hollingdean and Stanmer, Hanover and Elm Grove, Queen’s Park and St Peter’s and North Laine.

For the full story click here.

Tonnes of recycling burned every day, says Brighton binman

From The Argus

Ken Quantick, 71, drives recycling lorries for Brighton and Hove City Council in the Lewes Road area.

His three-man crew covers a round that stretches from Bear Road to Asda in Hollingbury.

Mr Quantick claims Veolia, the company responsible for disposing of Brighton’s rubbish, has told his crew to tip all their recycling into the household waste facility.

“This means our eight tonnes of recycling a day is going straight into the incinerator at Newhaven,” he said.

He says this is because the company cannot cope with the amount of recycling being taken into the Hollingdean depot.

But Veolia claims it only rejects recycling which has been contaminated.

Mr Quantick said his crew had “a very low contamination rate” and had not had any problems over the past two years.

“This is a scandal,” he said.

“The public need to know what is going on.

“Our management at Cityclean seem powerless to do anything.”

Mr Quantick said Veolia had told him and his crew their recycling was contaminated with black bin bags and old recycling boxes, which meant whole loads were being burned.

Pictures from the depot appear to show recycling which contains black bags and recycling boxes.

But Mr Quantick, a council binman for 14 years, said it was routine for his crew to fill black bags with recycling on some streets where steep banks made it difficult to get wheelie bins to the lorries.

He said Veolia only started complaining about this on Thursday.

“We have been using this system all year,” he said.

He also said some people threw their old black recycling boxes into the big communal recycling bins – which dustmen have no way of checking until they empty the lorries.

He said the real reason was that Veolia could not cope with the amount of recycling.

“They are overwhelmed,” he said.

“It’s a mountain. They can’t clear it quickly enough. They are using this as an excuse. It’s absolutely disgusting.

“I don’t know what the public is going to think when they find out their recycling is being burned.”

Veolia said: “We are a recycling company and we recycle viable material.

“All recycled material that is collected is assessed for levels of contamination when presented at our materials recovery facility in Hollingdean.

“Loads might be rejected if it is deemed to contain too high levels of contamination – this is to protect the quality of our end recycled product and ensure the best environmental performance.

“There is no reason, and it would not make any sense, for us to reject recyclables.”

The council said: “We know there is an issue concerning contamination at the Veolia site.

“We will be speaking to Veolia and the drivers about the situation during our investigation.”