Category Archives: Community

Graffiti Case Study – how Chichester dealt with its graffiti problem

From The Brighton Society

Almost three years ago, Chichester District Council invited the Brighton Society to meet the Council’s Community Development Officer to see what lessons could be learnt from Chichester’s experience of dealing with its graffiti problem.

Chichester Council’s campaign against graffiti began over fifteen years ago in response to quite severe graffiti problems in the Pallant Conservation Area. The Chief Executive at the time was very keen that the problem be addressed, and with strong support from the Councillors, provided a sufficiently adequate budget to make a start on dealing with the issue.

Their success can be judged by the evident embarrassment of our host that he was unable to find many examples of graffiti to show us in central Chichester.  Of the few we did see, three had been intentionally left as examples of acceptable graffiti – see a couple of examples below.

….he was unable to find many examples…..these had been intentionally left

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click here for the full story.

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Progress update – Springfield Road trees – February 2018

Many thanks once again to all those who donated to our campaign to preserve, protect and replace Springfield Road trees. It was a marvellous effort and no doubt those involved are wondering what happens now – so here is an update.

Since our crowdfunding campaign successfully closed we have been in close contact with the Council’s arboriculturalists who are checking which trees already need to be replaced, and assessing which trees are in danger. These sites once formally identified will therefore be preserved, we are assured, even if it takes a long while before actual replacement happens. The process will however be slow, as dead tree sites need in due course to be ‘ground out’ and we are told ordering trees happens at least a year in advance. For each site we will make the financial contribution from the funds raised as planned. It is possible we may see some replanting next spring, we are hoping for that, and certainly no later than the season after.

Looking longer term there has been much discussion about protecting our new trees when they arrive. All ideas are welcome, and Councillor Littman and residents are in discussion about how best to make sure saplings are not damaged by vehicles. All ideas are welcome.

When more is known, it will be posted as a further update on this site. Thank you once again to everyone who supported this.

Happy New Year Fixsters!

Brighton Repair Café

Well, we are back and we are ready to help you learn how to repair your stuff!

We have a new venue for our January event… the wonderful Hanover Centre on Southover Street in Hanover.

We are trying out an earlier time of 10:30-12:30 so come and join us for some morning fixing.

We will be darning, sewing, glueing and opening up those broken electricals to see if they can be fixed too.

See you there Brighton!

BRCflyerHanvoverJAN18

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Parents win fight over school catchment area changes

From The Argus

School Catchment Map

Controversial plans to change secondary school catchment areas and cut primary school class sizes have been abandoned.

The proposals rallied opposition from thousands of parents who said good primaries would be forced to close, and secondary pupils would be separated from friends and forced to travel hours a day, if the changes went ahead.

But in a dramatic climbdown following a public consultation – and months of petitions and threats of legal challenges from parents – Brighton and Hove city council announced a report is recommending it scrap all of the controversial aspects of the plans.

Benfield and Hertford primary schools will remain two-form entry, and no secondary catchment areas will change. Four of the city’s secondary schools will take extra pupils over the next few years, to accommodate the demographic “bulge” which was the reason for the proposed changes.

The U-turn was greeted with joy by campaigners. Parent Dave Boyle, who organised opposition to the plan, said: “I’m sorry we’ve had to spend so much time becoming education policy experts over the last six months, but I’m thrilled the council has now made the right decision.”

The decision also cancels the planned creation of an additional secondary school on the site of Brighton General hospital, which had been pencilled in for September 2019.

The chair of the children, young people and skills committee, Councillor Dan Chapman, said: “In the circumstance we are now facing, I believe that the benefits of leaving the catchment areas as they are outweigh the possible benefits of the changes that were proposed.”

He added: “Taking these changes in circumstances into consideration our administration believes that the new free school, as proposed in 2015, is no longer in the best interests of the city as a whole.

“We have therefore advised the University of Brighton Academies Trust that we have withdrawn the in-principle support for the new school.”

Green education spokeswoman Councillor Alex Phillips and Conservative education spokeswoman Councillor Vanessa Brown both told The Argus it was a shame that secondary school heads – who latterly said they could accommodate more pupils – had not said the same to the council before the lengthy and costly consultation started.

A statement issued by Richard Bradford, Headteacher of Dorothy Stringer School and Chair of the Secondary School Partnership, read: “We welcome the council’s willingness to take on board the feedback we have given them about school places, and their flexibility in responding to a rapidly changing situation.

“We would also like to acknowledge the sensitivity and partnership spirit with which the University of Brighton has worked on their free school project, and to thank them for all their work on this.

“However, given the circumstances the city now faces we agree with the view that there is no longer a need for a new secondary school in the city.

“We are committed to working in partnership with the council to deliver new school places, and to ensuring the long-term sustainability of all the city’s secondary schools.”

“Letter of concern” about local policing

London Road Area Local Action Team

Dear Chief Inspector Chris Veale,

I am writing to you on behalf of the London Road Area Local Action team – mandated by the recent LAT meeting 12/12/17 . They wish me to explain why they feel concerned and dismayed at the current policing situation and why the response upon which we are receiving feedback is felt to be inadequate.

I would like to point out that we enjoy good working relations with [our local Inspector], but feel that his good efforts may be hampered by lack of resources and policy imposed on him from higher up.

At a recent LAT chairs’ Forum meeting the police representative appeared to express the view to the effect that crime and disorder, especially drug-related crime is no worse than it has ever been. This was a very loyal and morale-maintaining comment for him to make.

But when reported back to our LAT it…

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Save Our Trees Success!

We have reached our target to protect and replace the trees in Springfield Road!

Some wonderfully generous pledges have been made today to get us over the line, in addition to those received throughout our campaign to save these trees.

All our lovely backers will now receive confirmation from Spacehive that their pledges will be collected in the next couple of days, and they will have the personal satisfaction of knowing they played  a real part in securing these beautiful assets for generations to come.

Huge thanks to everybody who has contributed, we can’t thank you enough.

Watch this space for progress reports, as we will shortly be able to return to the Council’s arboriculturalists to report our success, and to arrange and negotiate the practical steps now needed to finalise this project. Thanks again.