Category Archives: Planning

Tell us about the places in your neighbourhood

From Paula Goncalves – 

The council is developing new guidance – the Urban Design Framework – to help shape buildings and spaces around the city. The aim is to make them easier to use and more attractive to people.

As the city grows we will be presented with proposals to develop and build new buildings and places. This provides the opportunity to improve existing areas as well as making sure we get usable, flexible and high quality new buildings and attractive public spaces.

To help us achieve this aim, the council wants to learn about your experience of the city to help create more welcoming buildings and public spaces through design.

Everyone in Brighton & Hove is invited to take part in a survey to share their views about the places they use and how they think these places could be improved.

All over the city there are close-to-home places that people have access to and enjoy spending time in. These can include parks, streets, squares, common areas of schools (eg playgrounds and playing fields), transport facilities and shopping areas.

Please fill in the survey at https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/udf-places The survey is open until 13 September 2018.

The information you provide will help shape the Urban Design Framework which the council, developers and landowners will use to make sure buildings and spaces fit the needs and aspirations of everyone who lives, works, studies in and visits the city.

Paula Goncalves
Planning Policy, Projects & Heritage Team
Brighton & Hove City Council

Email: planningprojects@brighton-hove.gov.uk
W: www.brighton-hove.gov.uk

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Consultation on the Draft City Plan Part Two

Consultation on the Draft City Plan Part Two. 5th July – 13th September 2018.

What is the Draft City Plan Part Two?

City Plan Part 2 will support the implementation and delivery of the adopted City Plan Part 1 and builds on previous consultation and stakeholder engagement on City Plan Part Two undertaken in 2016.

The Plan includes:

Site allocations for new housing, student housing and employment sites.
Tougher controls on houses of multiple occupation (HMOs).
Policies for minimum internal space standards, usable outdoor space, self-build housing, homes for older people and wheelchair-friendly properties.
A new policy to help protect public houses as community benefit.
Recognition of important shopping parades in neighbourhoods.
Policies for the protection of town centres, business space, and leisure development.
A policy for encouraging new and safeguarding community facilities.
Transport, design, heritage, and environmental themed policies.

Your comments at this stage are important in helping to inform the final version of the City Plan Part Two.

How do I submit my comments?

In order for us to handle your comments efficiently we recommend that you make your comments using the council’s online consultation portal https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/cityplan-part2consultation

Responses can also be submitted using our MS Word representation forms:

By email to planningpolicy@brighton-hove.gov.uk
By post to Draft CPP2 Policy Projects & Heritage Team, Brighton & Hove City Council, First Floor Hove Town Hall, Norton Road, Grand Avenue, Hove BN3 3BQ
All comments must be received by the Council no later than 5pm on Thursday 13 September 2018. Please kindly note that we cannot accept responses received after this time/date.

Where can I view the Draft City Plan Part Two and its supporting documents?

Electronically via: www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/cityplan-part2

Hardcopies of Draft City Plan Part Two and its supporting documents can also be viewed during normal opening hours at: –

Brighton Customer Service Centre, Bartholomew House, Bartholomew Square Brighton BN1 1JE
Hove Customer Service Centre, Hove Town Hall, Norton Road BN3 3BQ;
Jubilee Library, BN1 1GE
Hove Library, BN3 2EG
Portslade Library, BN41 1XR.

The Draft City Plan Part 2 and a small selection of its supporting documents will also be available to be viewed at all other city libraries.

Keep Varndean Green

From Green Vardean

Varndean College plans to sell off some of its land which is currently designated as a nature reserve to build just 10 houses.  An outline planning application has been submitted to Brighton and Hove Council

We are concerned that:

  • This application is for outline planning permission. The full application may be far more intrusive and destructive. 

  • The proposal sets a dangerous precedent for more development on the Varndean campus and elsewhere. Any green space in Brighton and Hove will be at risk. Plans are also confirmed for a full size, net covered all- weather sports pitch on the campus near Surrenden Crescent. 

  • A new road will be built behind and crossing the footpath, destroying the hedgerow, creating even more traffic and congestion with major safety risks for pedestrians, cyclists and motorists and ruining the view. 

  • A biodiversity reserve will be destroyed. Developed in 2010 with the support of the Council and Butterfly Conservation, the reserve is home to colonies of legally protected butterflies like the Small Blue. 

  • The proposed modern houses are not in keeping with the the local area. The view of the housing from the road will be of the garages and a semi-basement frontage. They will be very unattractive, block the view over Brighton and overlook the sports field, risking the privacy of our young students. 

    Click here for links to comment on the applications.

£300 million scheme to revive a derelict Brighton site with hundreds of homes

From Brighton & Hove News

A £300 million scheme to revive a derelict Brighton site with hundreds of homes and jobs has been signed by Brighton and Hove City Council and developer U+I.

The regeneration specialist said: “U+I today announces that a deal to radically transform the Lewes Road area of Brighton is now unconditional after contracts completed with Brighton and Hove City Council to deliver one of the city’s biggest ever mixed-use regeneration projects.

“Preston Barracks, in Brighton, a brownfield site which has lain derelict for over two decades, forms part of the wider regeneration partnership with the University of Brighton which will transform the area into a thriving new destination for people to live, work and learn.

“The £300 million gross development value project will deliver over 1,500 new jobs, 369 homes, 1,338 student beds and bring £281 million into Brighton and Hove’s economy over the next ten years.

“U+I’s proposals for the Preston Barracks site include 369 new homes, 534 student beds (a partnership with Scape Student Living), and a 50,000 sq ft innovation hub for start-up businesses and entrepreneurs.

“This forms part of plans to attract enterprising and high-growth companies and increase international investment into Brighton and Hove.

“The hub has already attracted £7.7 million of grant funding from Coast to Capital Local Enterprise Partnership.

“This innovation hub is a tried and tested model for U+I. The first fully operational hub, known as the CRL (Central Research Laboratory) is located at its Old Vinyl Factory project in Hayes, where it complements the ongoing regeneration work by providing an innovative new workplace for local start-ups and entrepreneurs, and a place for the community to come together.”

For the full report click here.

£300m plan to regenerate Preston Barracks approved

From The Argus

The £300 million transformation of a Georgian barracks site is set to go ahead after developers were given planning permission.

The University of Brighton proposal was unanimously approved by Brighton and Hove City Council’s planning committee yesterday.

Developers U+I will carry out the work to regenerate Preston Barracks in Lewes Road and the university’s Moulsecoomb campus.

The regeneration of Preston Barracks is predicted to generate £500 million for the city economy and create around 1,500 jobs, according to the university’s vice chancellor Debra Humphris.

Plans for the site, which has been derelict for 20 years, include building 369 homes, 1,338 student bedrooms and a new home for the university’s business school before 2021.

Professor Humphris said: “The university has been part of the city for 150 years.

“This development will go a considerable way to reducing pressure on local housing and reduce the need for cars and travel.

“We are committed to improving sustainability. It will provide a stunning new gateway into the city.”

The designs have undergone months of public consultation resulting in a number of objections. Among them are questions over the project’s viability, air pollution created by increased car parking and traffic, transport and congestion, lack of affordable housing and the effect it will have on Saunders Park View and Coombe Road residents.

During the meeting yesterday, Rebecca Barkaway, a member of the Coombe Road Area Local Action Team, said: “We are being transformed into the university’s campus.

“In an area that is already overwhelmed by a student community this just seems a step too far.

“We want to see investment in local provisions.

“We believe the 369 non-student houses should have a covenant placed on them so they don’t become HMOs.

“We also want to see money spent on improving the Saunders Park area.”

Environmental campaign group Brighton and Hove Friends of the Earth (BHFOE) objected to the proposed increase in parking across the development.

The group argued it would lead to increased traffic and air pollution. The group claimed that if built the development would keep air pollution levels above the legal limit.

More than 400 responses were received supporting the development before the meeting.

The original proposal was revised to include 19 additional homes, a reduction in the height of certain buildings, additional community facilities and a transport plan.

A new pedestrian bridge across Lewes Road will be built as well as new squares and crossings which are designed to improve pedestrian access.

Cycle docks and more than 1,000 cycle parking spaces are included in the plans, as well as 30 spaces for bicycles used as part of the city’s new bike hire scheme.

In March, the Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner requested more money to cover the cost of more officers and staff set up costs, investment in IT operations, additional vehicles and the cost of supporting additional officers, as a result of the proposed development.

Andy Taylor, who represented the commissioner at the meeting, repeated the submission for £217,336 to fund the cost of extra policing to accompany the development.

The planning committee agreed not to support the request for more money to fund extra policing.

Richard Upton, deputy chief executive of U+I, said: “This is a major milestone for the Preston Barracks project, one of the largest and most ambitious regeneration projects to have been brought forward in Brighton for a number of years.

“We have the opportunity to transform this area of Brighton, which has been derelict for 20 years and deliver a huge number of benefits to the local community and the wider city.

“Our Circus Street project is also moving forward at great pace, regenerating another important part of the city.

“We will deliver world class, imaginative urban design on each project, building on the bohemian audacity of the Prince Regent and leaving a lasting legacy that befits such an inspirational city.”

End is nigh for ugliest building in Sussex

From The Argus

Anston House

The clock is ticking for Sussex’s ugliest building as its demolition date draws closer.

Demolition of the infamously unaesthetic landmark Anston House, which has been leering over Preston Park in Brighton since 1969 and been vacant for almost two thirds of its existence, is due to begin later this year.

It looks set be the first of three developments worth £100 million whose construction has been held up by red tape and complex negotiations since they were given the green-light in December.

In total, the three developments, which include Station Street in Brighton and the former Texaco garage in Kingsway, Hove, will deliver almost 300 new homes, 10,000 square metres of business space and nearly 1,000 jobs on sites that have been derelict for more than half a century combined.

The planning committee decisions to grant consent to the three projects, all in excess of seven storeys, was greeted with criticism and derision in some quarters by campaigners who claimed the schemes would set a precedent for the city to be transformed into “Croydon-on-sea”.

Anston House developers First Base have been involved in complex discussions with Brighton and Hove City Council over Section 106 agreements with site preparation underway as the developers deal with a number of issues including slow worms.

But haters of the building will not get the chance for a cathartic moment watching the structure being blown to the ground. Instead its demolition will be a gradual process over a number of weeks.

The construction of its replacement will take the best part of two years, with residents due to move in in 2019.

The site next to the King Alfred in Hove is said to be “under construction” though the fenced-off site has not altered since the petrol station closed in 2015.

A nine-storey block of 55 flats and the redevelopment of the 109-year-old Alibi pub are planned for the site by Rocco Homes, which has four projects in the pipeline around Worthing, including 32 apartments in Chapel Road and 76 flats in The Causeway in Durrington.

For the long derelict corner site of Station Street, currently used as an ad-hoc car park, a seven-storey grade A office block has been granted consent.

Developer McAleer & Rushe will announce later this year when work is set to begin on the site.

A First Base spokeswoman said: “We are excited about the possibilities for Anston House which has been derelict for too long. We are in the final stages of completing the Section 106 planning agreement and have been carrying out preliminary survey work ahead of construction. It is hoped that work will start in the near future.”