Category Archives: Public Transport

Unblocking the Croydon bottleneck – public consultation

From Brighton & Hove Economic Partnership

Network Rail are developing major proposals to upgrade the Brighton Main Line – one of the most congested routes in the country –  to provide more reliable, faster and more frequent services on the line and its branches.

Key to the upgrade are proposals to remove the most challenging bottleneck on Britain’s railway network at the ‘Selhurst triangle’ and East Croydon station as part of proposals for the East Croydon to Selhurst Junction Capacity Enhancement Scheme.

To check out the plans, the Brighton consultation will be on:

Monday 10 and Tuesday 11 December 2018 – The Brighthelm Centre, North Road, Brighton, BN1 1YD, 4.00-8.00pm.

The proposals

To unblock the Croydon bottleneck and provide more reliable, more frequent and faster services we are developing proposals to provide:

An expanded and enhanced East Croydon station

A rebuilt station with two additional platforms, a larger concourse with improved facilities for passengers and better connections with the town centre and other transport links, supporting the ongoing regeneration of central Croydon. These new station works would also be designed to allow for new offices and homes to be built above the new station in the future.

‘Selhurst triangle’ remodelling

We would improve track layouts north of East Croydon station and remodel the junctions at the ‘Selhurst triangle’, by removing the existing junctions and building new flyovers and dive-unders.

Lower Addiscombe Road/Windmill Bridge reconstruction

To remodel ‘Selhurst triangle’ junctions and provide more platforms at East Croydon station we would need to expand the railway from five to seven tracks north of East Croydon station. This would require the current bridge over the railway to be rebuilt to provide space for the two additional tracks.

Other proposed work

Our proposals for the ‘Selhurst triangle’ and East Croydon station (East Croydon to Selhurst Junction Capacity Enhancement Scheme) would support planned works. This includes works at Norwood Junction station to reconfigure the tracks to enable more trains to run, increase station capacity and provide step-free access to all platforms at the station.

Please note that we are not consulting on planned works to the existing railway.  These works are within the railway boundary and will be carried out under existing permitted development rights.

What Are The Benefits?

More reliable journeys

By improving track layouts, remodelling the ‘Selhurst triangle’ and constructing two new tracks and two new platforms at East Croydon station, we would remove the bottleneck which causes delays and disruption, improving the punctuality of services.

Faster journeys

More tracks and remodelled junctions would also mean we would be able to speed up some services through the area.

More services

Once we deliver our proposals to unblock the Croydon bottleneck to improve the reliability of existing services, we would then be able work with train operators to consider running more trains.

A boost to the regional and national economy

As the main route connecting the capital with Gatwick Airport and the south coast improving the Brighton Main Line will provide a significant boost to the regional and national economy.

An expanded and enhanced East­ Croydon station

We would increase concourse space, provide new entrances and transform passenger facilities.  The work would allow above the station to be developed in the future.

Benefits of our wider plans

While we are not consulting on our plans for Norwood Junction station, as these proposed works are within the railway boundary, we would deliver more train and passenger capacity and step-free access to all platforms at the station as part of our wider plans.

Transport & Works Act Order (TWAO)

Our proposals for removing the Croydon bottleneck as part of the East Croydon to Selhurst Junction Capacity Enhancement Scheme requires work to take place outside the railway boundary.

Where we are proposing to use land or build outside the railway boundary, we must prepare an application for a Transport and Works Act Order (TWAO) from the Secretary of State for Transport. If permission is given we would have the necessary powers to undertake the work.

We are now consulting with the public, stakeholders and the wider rail industry and the feedback will help inform our proposals.  We will then seek permission to deliver our proposals through a TWAO application.

Work taking place within the railway boundary, including works at Norwood Junction station, would be constructed by Network Rail under our permitted development rights.

Contact Us

For more information on the proposals you can e-mail at CARS@networkrail.co.uk

You can also call Network Rail’s National Helpline on 03457 11 41 41 or contact us @NetworkRailSE

Update from Govia Thameslink Railway and Network Rail

From Brighton & Hove Economic Partnership

Interim timetable update

The first two weeks of the interim timetable on Thameslink and Great Northern routes have gone positively; we’ve delivered a more reliable service with far fewer delays and cancellations, which in turn has improved our overall service to our customers.

Prioritising peak-time services continues to be our main focus. There’s still a lot of work to do and we’ve had to deal with some issues which are covered in more detail below.

At the beginning of next week, when the interim timetable will have been in place for two full weeks, we will review and provide you with PPM data comparing current performance with the level preceding the May timetable change. We will also provide some commentary on what operational and infrastructure issues have been happening, to give some context to the figures.

Additional compensation

The qualifying period for the additional industry compensation scheme ends on 28 July; as well as ticket acceptance on other services. Phase one of the compensation scheme will launch at the end of August when we will get in touch with customers who we believe are entitled to compensation based on data that we hold for annual and monthly season ticket holders.

When the automated process is complete, those who have not been contacted but believe they are due to receive additional compensation will be able to apply in phase 2. Applications will be made via a dedicated online additional compensation web form where you will be requested to provide evidence of the season ticket(s) held between 20 May 2018 and 28 July 2018. Before phase one commences we have to undertake a huge piece of work to identify who is eligible from our season ticket database and online sales records.

Delay Repay

The implementation of the May timetables caused significant disruption to customers across Thameslink and Great Northern. To address this we encouraged customers to claim on either the intended 20 May timetable or the service of the day. As the service is now more stable and providing more reliability for passengers we will return to the industry standard approach for delay repay from the 30 July.

Up to and on 29 July

Customers will still be able to claim for services travelled up to and on 29 July on the original May timetables or on the plan of the day

30 July onwards

However, if a claim is put in for travelling on or after 30 July, it will only be valid on the timetable we are advertising and operating on the day of travel. More information can be found here.

Hot weather

As the hot weather continues we encourage people to plan ahead and always carry water. Water is available at our major stations. When rails are in direct sunshine which can be as much as 20°C hotter than air temperature, they expand as they get hotter, and can start to curve – known as ‘buckling’. This is because they are made from steel.

When this happens Network Rail may have to introduce speed restrictions or occasionally have to close the track to allow engineers to attend on site. More information can be found here.

Brighton Pride

Next week we look ahead to Brighton Pride taking place between 3-5 August. We absolutely understand how important this is for the local community and economy. Both GTR and Network Rail have internal teams in place, which have been carrying out planning for events to be held locally celebrating Pride and what it means to people, as well as operational logistics for some time. We are running late night trains to get as many revellers home as possible.

Over the weekend, trains to, from and through Brighton, Hove and Preston Park are expected to be very busy.

We’re asking customers to:

  • Travel outside peak times where possible and allow extra time for their journeys as they may have to queue
  • Travel earlier in the evening if possible as the last trains of the day are expected to be particularly busy
  • Purchase tickets in advance where possible as there are expected to be long queues at ticket offices and ticket machines during the event
  • Re-check their journey immediately before travelling for any on-the-day alterations

As a crowd control measure:

  • Preston Park station will be closed all day on Saturday 4 and Sunday 5 August
  • London Road (Brighton) will be closed from 12 noon on Saturday and all day Sunday

Full details are available at https://www.southernrailway.com/travel-information/plan-your-journey/brighton-pride 
Engineering works between Lewes to Seaford engineering works

Network Rail will be undertaking engineering signalling works between Lewes – Seaford from 18 – 28 August 2018, closing the line between the two stations. Trains will still run between Brighton and Lewes with a replacement bus service 10 minutes in the peak and 15 in the off-peak stopping at all stations to Seaford.

Posters are on display at affected stations, and more information will be added to Southern’s website and on National Rail Enquiries next week. During the closure, staff will be on hand at all the station to assist passengers and provide water. More information can be found here.

 

The Office of Rail & Road has published today its initial findings after beginning its investigation into the May timetable changes. More details can be read here. Please click here for Network Rail’s response.

For further information contact or email gtr.stakeholders@gtrailway.com.

Country’s first electric bus fleet to be ready by autumn

From The Argus

THE first fleet of electric buses in the country is almost ready to take to the roads after enough funds have been raised to complete the project.

The Big Lemon previously received Government funding and has now raised the £405,000 needed to add three new electric buses to its fleet, which serves the people of Brighton and Hove.

The company, which was founded in 2007, is expecting its fleet of six buses to be up and running by autumn after initial test runs are carried out along certain routes.

Tom Druitt, founder and CEO of The Big Lemon, said: “I am thrilled to bits that the money has been raised so quickly.

“We have had 128 investors in total. They have been investing anything from £100 to £20,000.

“We have asked people why they are investing and the most common response is because they see it as the way things should be going.

“It will be the first in the country. It is a small network but a great start.

“We are always looking at the next step.

“We run various other services as well and are keen to run all these on electric as well.

“We have got lots of plans and are looking at what kind of different services we can offer alongside the public bus routes.

“This includes potentially more effectively routed and on demand services.”

The zero-emissions buses, which are fitted with solar panels, will be able to serve the whole route planned by the company once the fleet is finished.

The company set up a bond offer to attract investment for the project last month and after raising the funds needed, it will now be looking to raise an additional £135,000 to fund an extra bus for the fleet.

The project has been aided by money gained through the Clean Bus Fund and the Low Emission Bus Scheme.

It has gained the support of Brighton and Hove City Council and the Department for Transport (DfT).

One of the buses in the current fleet was a retrofit funded by the Clean Bus Fund and the three new additions to the fleet will be 138kWh Optare Solo electric buses.

The company set about raising the money after being awarded £513,000 from the DfT’s Low Emission Bus scheme.

With high levels of air pollution in mind, the company wants every community across the country to have access to a similar scheme by 2030.

For more information about the project or to invest and help the company fund a seventh bus for the fleet, visit thebiglemon.com/electric.

Valley Gardens roadworks to cause traffic ‘chaos’

From The Argus

An artist’s impression of the Valley Gardens scheme

Every southbound car entering Brighton’s central avenue will be squeezed into a single lane of traffic this summer. Two years of roadworks to redesign traffic flow and pedestrian access around Valley Gardens will begin as early as June.

The decision to start digging up one of the busiest roads in the city during the tourist season was criticised by tourism experts, traders, residents’ groups, public transport pressure groups, taxi companies and unions. Critics have predicted “chaos” and “gridlock” and raised the spectre of tailbacks radiating far beyond the centre of the city. The council said disruption would be mitigated wherever possible.

Meanwhile the roadworks surrounding the Shelter Hall development at the foot of West Street will not finish this summer as planned but will continue until at least next autumn. That development is now projected to cost twice its original £10 million budget, and the council is working on ways to come up with extra money from its own tight resources as well as from central Government.

On Tuesday 6th February, a meeting of the Greater Brighton Economic Board confirmed work on the £11 million Valley Gardens scheme would begin in June, although yesterday a Brighton and Hove City Council spokeswoman said it “hoped” to start work on the highway “towards the end of summer”.

The first phase of the scheme will include closure of one of the two southbound lanes of traffic on the eastern side of Victoria Gardens from near St Peter’s Church. The Valley Gardens development seeks to open up the several, underused green spaces in the centre of the city from St Peter’s Church down to Old Steine.

At present the route is a one way system with two lanes running north, and two south. Once the redevelopment is complete, private vehicles will be restricted to the east of the gardens, with one lane northbound and one lane southbound. On the west, a much quieter road will carry just buses and taxis, northbound and southbound. Extra crossings, extra cycle lanes, and extensive planting and landscaping will make the area easier to access and enjoy on foot.

Yesterday the council said work and diversions would be well publicised and the main route would only occasionally be subject to complete closure.

Anne Ackord, who runs the Palace Pier and speaks for the Brighton and Hove Tourism Alliance, said: “Summer is never the best time to start any disruption. We need to get people in to the city, and we know parking is a problem as it is, so you don’t want anything to get in the way of the best possible summer. At the pier, we’re doing refurbishment work and maintenance now, because it’s winter and it’s quiet. We wouldn’t schedule anything to start later than Easter, because then you damage business.”

Adam Chinnery, chairman of the Seafront Traders Association, said: “It seems very odd, when we get massive domestic tourism that comes right down that road in the summer. And we don’t get nearly as much during the winter. It would seem a lot better to do this kind of project in the winter.”

Steve Percy, chairman of the People’s Parking Protest, said: “It’s going to be an absolute nightmare. I fail to see why Valley Gardens is going to start at the beginning of the tourist season when in fact it should have been started at the end of the season. That’s just common sense.”

Peter Elvidge, secretary of Brighton Area Buswatch, said: “It’s absolutely not the right time of year. “It’s going to be chaos I imagine. The Valley Gardens scheme is going to narrow the road down to a single lane through the roadworks, which will cause huge traffic jams and that will spread throughout the city.”

John Streeter, of Streamline Taxis, said: “I can see this scheme backfiring big time. There’s going to be major tailbacks coming into the city. Summer weekends are very busy and this will have a major impact.”

GMB union branch secretary Mark Turner said: “That’s not very clever timing really is it? That’s the beginning of the summer season, it’s the most important for the city and we’re going to cause major disruption to traffic. It’ll be bad for local businesses – we’ll be saying ‘come to Brighton and be gridlocked’.”

Not everyone was so negative. Theatre Royal manager John Baldock said: “Whenever you did it it’s going to upset somebody. Anything that can improve the city is a good thing, it’s never going to be painless.”

The scheme – originally a Green idea – has cross-party support so opposition politicians have focused on whether the Labour administration will make it happen efficiently.

Green Party spokesman Councillor Pete West said: “My concern is the Labour administration can’t deliver this competently – their project management is not good.

“Once they’ve started digging up, they need to complete within the shortest timeframe to minimise disruption.” 

Conservative Party spokesman Councillor Lee Wares said: “It is essential the Labour administration carefully co-ordinate the construction phases to avoid interrupting all the events our city holds. With Shelter Hall now over-running by a year it is crucial that Labour don’t take their eye off the ball because if they do, it will be a disaster for the city.”

Labour Councillor Alan Robins, the administration’s lead member for tourism, said: “I knew it was going to start, I didn’t know the start date.”

Later in a council statement he said: “Brighton and Hove attracts up to 11 million visitors a year and our marketing activity already encourages visitors to come by train or use other forms of public transport, where possible, as we know that car travel is a major contributor to congestion and poor air quality.”

The Valley Gardens scheme is expected to take around two years.

RMT announce new January 2018 strike on Southern trains

From The Argus

Commuters are due to face disruption with the announcement of another train strike in the new year.

Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union will walk out on January 8 as part of a long-running dispute over the role of guards and driver-only trains.

The union said it had made “every single effort” to resolve the bitter disputes, which it insisted were about safety.

The strikes will cause fresh problems for passengers, days after rail fares increase.

It also falls on the same day Brighton and Hove Albion play Crystal Palace in the third round of the FA Cup at the Amex stadium in Falmer.

RMT general secretary Mick Cash said: “Every single effort that RMT has made to reach negotiated settlements has been kicked back in our faces and we are left with no option but to confirm a further phase of industrial action.

“No one should be in any doubt. These disputes are about putting the safety of the travelling public before the profits of the private train companies

“It is frankly ludicrous that we have been able to negotiate long-term arrangements in Scotland and Wales that protect the guards and passenger safety but we are being denied the same opportunities with rail companies in England.

“This suspension of normal industrial relations by the employers has to end if we are to make progress towards a solution that guarantees safe rail travel for all.”

Mr Cash said the Government should lift its “blockade” on talks in the separate disputes to allow the union to negotiate “freely” with the companies.

Andy Bindon, Human Resources Director at Govia Thameslink Railway, parent company of Southern, said: “We are very disappointed by today’s announcement of a further RMT strike in the New Year.

“Their decision is even more regrettable as it comes on the same day that we had invited them to talks in the hope of reaching a resolution to their long-running dispute.

“We ask them to call off the strike and come to the negotiating table as we have suggested on many occasions.”

Bike rental scheme to launch on 1 September

From The Argus

Brighton’s bike rental scheme will launch on September 1.

A total of 450 bikes will be stationed around the city for the start of the month at 30 docking stations.

A further 20 stations are still to be built.

The scheme, which is officially titled BTN BikeShare, has cost £1.45 million with Brighton and Hove City Council contributing £290,000.

To use the bikes customers will have to sign up via the official app or online – with registration already open.

The bicycles will cost the equivalent of 3p per minute to use, but there is a minimum of £1 per journey, meaning that an hour’s ride on the bike will cost £1.80.

Regular users can also get a year’s subscription for £72. However, this does not allow unlimited cycling and only allows the use of the bikes for one hour every day for the year.

The scheme is being operated by a company called Hourbike.

Owner Tim Caswell, said: “The scheme will be a very positive addition to the city, and has already largely been embraced by the community. We have seen how successful our bike share schemes have been in Reading, Oxford, and Liverpool – and these are cities that don’t have the same green credentials as Brighton and Hove, or the same bike technology.”

Speaking to The Argus, he added: “There’s a real buzz about Brighton and Hove and we are incredibly excited to be launching here”.

The majority of the docking stations are along the seafront, up towards the station and then further out towards the universities.

The bikes, which are designed by Social Bicyles (SoBi), are sponsored by Life Water UK. They feature a locking and GPS system meaning that cyclists will not have to find a docking hub to lock them up.

Among the groups to back the scheme is Coast to Capital.

Chief executive Jonathan Sharrock said: “The scheme will deliver a multitude of environmental and health benefits, create new jobs and provide an excellent green transport option.”

Rail union suspends strikes

From Brighton & Hove Independent

The RMT has suspended strike action by both drivers and guards on Southern Rail after being approached for direct talks with the Secretary of State.

The RMT union has suspended the industrial strike for guards planned for Tuesday, August 1, after the union’s general secretary was invited to meet with Chris Grayling, Secretary of State for transport.

A driver strike on Tuesday, August 1, Wednesday, August 2, and Friday, August 4, has also been called off.

“We instruct the General Secretary to arrange the meeting and to place back before this NEC an update on the progress of the talks by Tuesday, August 1,” a spokesman said.

“RMT will be making no further comment at this stage as we arrange details for the talks and allow them space to take place.”