New recycling bins are ‘unsuitable’ for some

From The Argus

Recycling bins wheeled out across the city have been called “totally unsuitable for certain streets” after residents complained or requested replacements.

Brighton and Hove city councillors have voiced the concerns of residents who think the 240 litre grey wheelie bins “look dreadful”, are blocking pavements and causing a hazard for disabled or elderly people and those using pushchairs.

Wish ward councillors Robert Nemeth and Garry Peltzer Dunn have written to Geoff Raw, the council’s chief executive, addressing problems with the bins faced by residents in the Poets’ Corner area of Hove.

Councillor Nemeth said: “We received many complaints about the new grey bins. Residents felt they just turned up out of the blue.

“The message was lost in communication. We knocked on around 800 doors and just over 50 per cent answered.

“Issues raised include them being too heavy, people having no front gardens to store bins and steps getting in the way, the general communication and administration of the bins behind the scenes, younger residents leaving bins on pavements and we received many complaints from mothers with buggies.”

Brighton and Hove City Council replaced stackable black plastic tubs for recycled waste with the large wheelie bins in June as part of a £1.1 million roll out, after trial schemes showed the larger bins increased recycling rates by four per cent.

Councillor Peltzer Dunn said: “People didn’t know what they were going to be getting so it was difficult to say they didn’t want it.

“We have heard comments from people saying that councils are only good for rubbish.

“It is not the majority but the minority who are concerned.”

The letter from both councillors states: “Houses on Stoneham Road, for example, are fronted by a narrow strip garden with waist-height walls along the pavement and knee-height walls along front paths.

“As the default bin is the larger size, tens of residents have requested a smaller replacement.

“Some residents have found it necessary to get rid of their grey wheelie bins entirely.

“We have had many reports of obstructions including one report from a disabled wheelchair user who had to turn around and go all the way back to the bottom of a street because her way was blocked entirely.”

Dick Page, ward councillor for Hanover and Elm Grove, said the “pavement clutter” causing obstructions was not just confined to Poets’ Corner.

About 45,000 bins have already been delivered out of the planned 60,000.

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